Mrs Beeton’s Household Management Book

Isabella Beeton

These wonderful illustrations are from ‘Mrs Beeton’s Book for Household Management’ which was published around 1861. We, at Mimi Berlin, are always in awe of what people used to call salads. Look at these colorful sombrero-like dishes below, aren’t they just great?! How much fun are they compared to the salads we serve today? Right, SO much more fun!

Book of Household Management

“Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management was a guide to all aspects of running a household in Victorian Britain, edited by Isabella Beeton. It was originally titled Beeton’s Book of Household Management, in line with the other guide-books published by Beeton. It was first published as a book in 1861 by S. O. Beeton Publishing, 161 Bouverie Street, London, a firm founded by her husband, Samuel Beeton.”

Home Life and Comfort

“Isabella, was 21 years old when she started working on the book, and she died at 28. The first publication was in 1859 in the form of 24 monthly installments. On December 25, 1861, the monthly installments were combined into book form and called The Book of Household Management, and was used as a guide for all Things Connected with Home Life and Comfort.”

The Grandmother of Modern Domestic Goddesses

“It was an immediate best-seller, selling 60,000 copies in its first year and totaling nearly two million copies by 1868. Beeton has been described as ‘the grandmother of modern domestic goddesses’ and to this day her name still has iconic status in Britain: most people recognize it and know its connotations, although relatively few have actually come into contact with the book itself.”

images/via viintage.com

Orang Belanda Hitam

Orang Belanda Hitam

Goodmorning! Here’s some interesting Dutch historical knowledge you don’t get to learn in school;

Kees Pop by Isaac Israëls and Jan Kooi by Johan Coenraad Leich (1882)

“Belanda Hitam (from Indonesian meaning “Black Dutchmen”, known in Javanese as Londo Ireng), were a group of African recruits in the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army during the colonial period. Between 1831 and 1872, over three thousand Africans were recruited from the Dutch Gold Coast for service as colonial troops in the Dutch East Indies. This recruitment was in fact an emergency measure, as the Dutch army lost thousands of European soldiers and a much larger number of “native” KNIL soldiers in the Java War against Prince Diponegoro.” (read more en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belanda_Hitam )

More interesting reads;
The black Dutchmen : African soldiers in the Netherlands East Indies, Kessel,W.M.J.van
Novel by Arthur Japin; The Two Hearts of Kwasi Boachi (1997).