Dots in Graphic Design by Geoff McFetridge

Dots in Graphic Design by Geoff McFetridge

Dots and other geometric shapes and optical illusion play a big role in the work of graphic designer Geoff McFetridge. We, at Mimi Berlin, love dots so we chose them. McFetridge works and lives in Los Angeles, amongst his clients are ‘big brands’ for instance Nike and Target, Next to advertising jobs he also worked with film director Spike Jonze and Colette (amongst a big list of others). Be sure to check his tumblr to see more of this, seemingly simple, work, it’s worth your while. xoxo Mimi

 

More DOTS on this blog

(images via http://geoffmcfetridge.tumblr.com/ / https://www.nieves.ch/834/studies / https://thehundreds.com/blogs/content/geoff-mcfetridge )

Yardley Slicker

Yardley Slicker

We, at Mimi Berlin, can spend lot’s of our time looking at make-up ads and campaigns, especially the older and American ones. We do find them intriguing: the way these photo’s, texts (Come play in our Yardley!) and gifts lure you into buying a product is almost magic (in our opinion) Below some of Yardley of London advertisements for the “Slicker” collections made in the 1960s and 1970s. The name “Slicker” alone is genius by itself!

Read all about Yardley of London HERE

brillcommunications.ca/ pinterest.com// blog.finnfemme.com/ rubylogan.blogspot /blog.finnfemme.com/

Edward Bernays Inventing Public Relations

Edward Bernays Inventing Public Relations

Yes, someone intvented PR!

Edward Bernays’ Green Campaign for Lucky Strike.
The women who smoked In the 1930s didn’t like the green color of the Lucky Strike packages. Edward Bernays set up a major campaign “to convince women that green was the new black.” With assistance from editors at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, green began to dominate the fashion world. He came up with the “Green Ball” held in 1934 in New York, featuring some of the city’s most prominent socialites.” (read more neatorama.com)

Edward Bernays for Lucky Strike.
In the late 1920s, American Tobacco Company chairman George Washington Hill wanted to gain the female market for his Lucky Strike cigarettes; so he hired Edward Bernays. Bernays PR company came up in the with the idea to market cigarettes as ‘Torches of Freedom’ Bare in mind that in the 19th century smoking for women in public was not done at all.
During the New York Easter Parade in 1929, “a young woman named Bertha Hunt stepped out into the crowded fifth avenue and created a scandal by lightning a Lucky Strike cigarette. The incident was highlighted even more because the press had been informed in advance of Hunt’s course of actions, and had been provided with appropriate leaflets and pamphlets. What they did not know was that Hunt was Bernays’s secretary and that this was the first in a long line of events that was aimed at getting women to puff. Bernays proclaimed that smoking was a form of liberation for women, their chance to express their new found strength and freedom.” (read more yourstory.com) That worked well! Lucky Strike sold “40 billion cigarettes in 1930 compared to 14 billion just five years earlier” (read more) historyisnowmagazine.com

It’s things-from-the-past-you-should-see-week, an educational program at Mimi Berlin.

If you want more than images; read on…. Continue reading

Photo on Photo Costume Jewelry Ads

Photo on Photo Costume Jewelry Ads

This is how ‘they’ lured you into buying bijoux; by creating a dream that you would know it actually was only that, a dream; these ads are a simple but such a strong incentive to steer the imagination in the right way. Nifty!

We, at the Mimi Berlin offices, got inspired by these advertisements made in the previous century…….The first image is a quick schetch by Mimi Berlin made in 2016: The CEO of the month brooch. (1960’s BSK flower brooch on a 1980’s ad for Nucci Valsecchi interiors from Vogue Italia, Dec. 1980)

more vintage costume jewelry ads

Veronica Lake’s Hairstyle

Veronica Lake’s Hairstyle

From pin-up to patriot.
About Ms Lake’s hairstyle before and during the second World War: taming Veronica’s cascading blond manes.
veronica-lake-hair
Veronica Lake and her famous and very populair peek-a-boo or witch-lock hairstyle in 1942 (image via lisawallerrogerss)

Veronica Lake was so populair in the forties that women copied her hairstyle. In the clip below (is it propaganda or plain advertising?) Ms Lake was set an example for women who had to wear safety hats while working at the factory during the second World War. Because “The Lake’s eyeview is entirely out of place on a war production plant”/ “Uncontrolled hair will never stay in place”/”the rhytm of precision work can be upset resulting in faulty work”.

Veronica Lake “put glamour in it’s proper wartime place” and changed her hairstyle on camera in an, ironically, German-like-bunroll-style which was also cute but not so much sexy. The poor factory girls however had to put on even less sexy and seriously ugly hats at work. The, safe, uniforms were sold as “Industrial Fashions” to women in the USA.

 

More Veronica Lake on this Blog

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Pink-A-Booty it’s a Girl!

Pink-A-Booty it’s a Girl!

Pink-A-Boo it's a Girl!Pink-A-Boo it's a Girl!
It’s Beyonce.
It’s a Girl! by Appdikted.

The week is pink @mimiberlin_amsterdam