Susan Bijl x Etnomanie Special Collection

Etnomanie by Ellie Uyttenbroek for Susan Bijl

Susan Bijl is a designer best known for her nylon shoppingbags. Ellie Uyttenbroek is best known for the ongoing photoseries Exactitudes. These two women themed up to create the newest ‘Susan Bijl collection’ named ETNOMANIE. Have a look at the campaign images below, how lovely are they?!Susan Bijl x Etnomanie Special Collection(campaign image credits: Photography by Jan Bijl. Models: Jelke Ostermann, Angelina Koemans, Johan Amenyeku, Ebony Netserab, Eisha Hersilia. Design: Mary Pelders. Assistance: Pia Please)

Wordplay

Etnomanie is a wordplay capturing the modern-life hysteria of globalization. Ms Uyttenbroek is the ‘inventor’ of this word. Click here to read more about the 2017 Etnomanie exhibition, shaped by Ellie Uytenbroek, at the Dutch Photomuseum in Rotterdam.

The collection of bags, pouches and a raincoat is available in five colors, based on skin tones. The colors are named after former Nobel Peace Prize winners: Wangari, Barack, Malala, Liu and Agnes (buy/see all at susanbijl.com)

Click for more on fashion and skintone here on this blog

Measuring Blueness with the Cyanometer

The Cyanometer: measuring color the Antique way

The Cyanometer is a magical yet simple instrument for measuring ‘blueness‘, not the feeling but specifically the colour intensity of blue sky. A Cyanometer consists of squares of paper dyed in graduated shades of blue and arranged in a color circle or square that can be held up and compared to the color of the sky. It helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. Measuring Blueness with the Cyanometer

(Horace-Bénédict de Saussure’s cyanometer, 1760)
For a modern day meter Continue reading

Mamie Eisenhower wore Pink

Mamie Eisenhower wore Pink

The US presidential inauguration of Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953 when Eisenhower’s wife Mamie Eisenhower wore a pink dress as her inaugural gown is thought to have been a key turning point to the association of pink as a color associated with girls. Mamie’s strong liking of pink led to the public association with pink being a color that “ladylike women wear.” The 1957 American musical Funny Face also played a role in cementing the color’s association with women.Mamie Eisenhower wore Pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mamie Eisenhower in her pink inaugural gown, painted in 1953 by Thomas Stevens. (img via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink) Continue reading

The Rainbow Flag ‘designed’ by Gilbert Baker

The Rainbow Flag ‘designed’ by Gilbert Baker

Added knowledge: A flag with a seven-striped rainbow design is used in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador is anachronically associated with Tawantin Suyu, or Inca territory. Even today in the city of Cusco, Peru it is common to see the flag around the city displayed even in government buildings and in Cusco main square. The flag is inspired on the wiphala which was part of Inca symbolism and used in the Tahuantinsuyo and traces its existence to the early 1920s.

Gilbert Baker, the man who came up with the Rainbow flag in1978 has passed away

Thursday night (March 30, 2017). He was 65. “Discussing his design at a 2015 exhibition at the New York Museum of Modern Art, Baker said: “I decided that we should have a flag; that a flag fit us as a symbol, that we are a people – a tribe, if you will. And flags are about proclaiming power, so it’s very appropriate. Baker’s design placed meaning on each colour: Pink (sexuality), Red (life), Orange (healing), Yellow (sunlight), Green (nature), Turquoise (art), Indigo (harmony) and Violet (human spirit). It has since been reduced to six colours, with pink and indigo removed. Blue is now used instead of turquoise.” (Read more at nme.com)

The Rainbow Flag designed by Gilbert Baker
(credits: Getty Images via nme.com)
The iconic Rainbow flag, which has been created to unite the gay community, fits perfectly In the series ‘Yes, that has been designed by a person’. Sometimes, with too uber-familiar symbols, you forget that there actually was a person who designed it. Just like the designers of, for example, the smiley or the peace-sign they often stay nameless. Hence this post.
Have a nice day! xoxo Mimi

300 Shades of Foundation

300 Shades of Foundation

From beige to brown 300 shades of foundation will do the trick. Let’s examine these colorcharts…..

Is It Magic Or Is It Foundation?…It’s Magic Foundation
Perfect looking skin for all ages, all skin tones (read more charlottetilbury.com
/blushoff.blogspot/beccacosmetics.com)

Edward Bernays Inventing Public Relations

Edward Bernays Inventing Public Relations

Yes, someone intvented PR!

Edward Bernays’ Green Campaign for Lucky Strike.
The women who smoked In the 1930s didn’t like the green color of the Lucky Strike packages. Edward Bernays set up a major campaign “to convince women that green was the new black.” With assistance from editors at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, green began to dominate the fashion world. He came up with the “Green Ball” held in 1934 in New York, featuring some of the city’s most prominent socialites.” (read more neatorama.com)

Edward Bernays for Lucky Strike.
In the late 1920s, American Tobacco Company chairman George Washington Hill wanted to gain the female market for his Lucky Strike cigarettes; so he hired Edward Bernays. Bernays PR company came up in the with the idea to market cigarettes as ‘Torches of Freedom’ Bare in mind that in the 19th century smoking for women in public was not done at all.
During the New York Easter Parade in 1929, “a young woman named Bertha Hunt stepped out into the crowded fifth avenue and created a scandal by lightning a Lucky Strike cigarette. The incident was highlighted even more because the press had been informed in advance of Hunt’s course of actions, and had been provided with appropriate leaflets and pamphlets. What they did not know was that Hunt was Bernays’s secretary and that this was the first in a long line of events that was aimed at getting women to puff. Bernays proclaimed that smoking was a form of liberation for women, their chance to express their new found strength and freedom.” (read more yourstory.com) That worked well! Lucky Strike sold “40 billion cigarettes in 1930 compared to 14 billion just five years earlier” (read more) historyisnowmagazine.com

It’s things-from-the-past-you-should-see-week, an educational program at Mimi Berlin.

If you want more than images; read on…. Continue reading