Shocking perfume bottle by Schiaparelli

Shocking perfume bottle by Schiaparelli

Elsa Schiapparelli had the perfume bottle for Shoking patented in December 1936. The perfume was launched In1937 and with that also the color shocking pink was invented. The bottle was designed by Léonor Fini and represented a dressmaker dummy following the curves of Mae West, a velvet measuring tape and was decorated with porcelain flowers (inspired by Dalí ‘s paintings of flower-sellers so says wikipedia) The bottle came with a black leather carry-on case lined with fabric in shocking pink.
Needless to say, but we will; Jean Paul Gaultier took the bottle design to the next level; In 1993, he launched his first fragrance for women “JEAN-PAUL GAULTIER” (which is now called “CLASSIQUE”),  in a bottle representing a female torso based on both Madonna and the bottle of Shocking de Schiaparelli. Variations on the JPG Torso Bottles come in maybe millions and were (are?) highly collectable….

visit the Schiaparelli site

Impossible Conversations Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada

Impossible Conversations Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada

The Met’s Spring 2012 Costume Institute exhibition, Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations, explores the striking affinities between Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada, two Italian designers from different eras. Inspired by Miguel Covarrubias’s “Impossible Interviews” for Vanity Fair in the 1930s, the exhibition features orchestrated conversations between these iconic women to suggest new readings of their most innovative work. Iconic ensembles are presented with videos of simulated conversations between Schiaparelli and Prada directed by Baz Luhrmann, focusing on how both women explore similar themes in their work through very different approaches.

The exhibition showcases approximately one hundred designs and forty accessories by Schiaparelli (1890–1973) from the late 1920s to the early 1950s and by Prada from the late 1980s to the present. Drawn from The Costume Institute’s collection and the Prada Archive, as well as other institutions and private collections, signature objects by both designers are arranged in seven themed galleries: “Waist Up/Waist Down,” “Ugly Chic,” “Hard Chic,” “Naïf Chic,” “The Classical Body,” “The Exotic Body,” and “The Surreal Body.”

Schiaparelli, who worked in Paris from the 1920s until her house closed in 1954, was closely associated with the Surrealist movement and created such iconic pieces as the “Tear” dress, the “Shoe” hat, and the “Bug” necklace. Prada, who holds a degree in political science, took over her family’s Milan-based business in 1978, and focuses on fashion that reflects the eclectic nature of Postmodernism. (The exhibition is made possible by Amazon. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast (via metmuseum)

Schiaparelli and Kimora Lee Simmons

Schiaparelli and Kimora Lee Simmons.
We love it when our own so called “bad taste” becomes mainstream, or even better, a bit “highbrow”! The catwalk at Schiaparelli’s couture show for fall 2014 was covered in panther (or is it ocelot?) printed carpet! Just the same as the walk-in closet Kimora Lee Simmons had when she still lived with Mr. Simmons (not sure if she still has the same carpet nowadays or if she still carries the name Simmons) Anyways, we at Mimi Berlin don’t actually believe in bad taste, check out our opinion about that HERE in a presentation we made a while ago. (images via instyle / style.com)