Inflatable! Blow Me Up Lamp Designed by Ingo Maurer

Inflatable Lamp

During Milan Design Week 2019 in April we, at Mimi Berlin, favoured some designs. One of them is the ‘Blow Me Up’ lamp signed by Ingo Maurer, but designed by him, Theo Möller, and Maurer’s team. As the name suggests this is an inflatable lamp, in the shape of a tube and made of plastic. One part is transparent the other part comes in a couple of metallic bright colors. What we like about the design is it’s simplicity and also that you can use tie-grips to hang it up, it isn’t the perfect lamp at all! It retails for about €270,- though.

M’ Afrique Detached

‘Blow Me Up’ was on show at the Moroso showroom in Via Pontaccio 10. The design isn’t new, it’s from 2017, but because of the fact that Moroso and Ingo Maurer are partners that didn’t matter we guess. Moroso’s ‘M’ Afrique Detached‘ installation is dedicated to this new partnership, ànd to the 10th anniversary of the M’ Afrique outdoor collection produced by Moroso furniture. Part of the designs in the M’afrique collection are made by crafstmen from Africa. The Shadowy Chair by Tord Boontje, for example, is made with a weaving technique used for fishing nets.

Quote

“The inflatable tube Blow Me Up by Theo Möller, Ingo Maurer & Team was first presented at Euroluce 2017. It is flexible to use: You can lean it against a wall, fasten it to the ceiling or wall with small hooks and nylon cords. It comes wrapped up in a box and is pumped up by the user. The LED-strip illuminates the reflecting side of the tube, thus dispersing indirect light into the room. Since summer 2018 on, Blow Me Up will be available in two sizes, 120 and 180 cm with the option to choose in between four colours.” (read more ingo-maurer.com)

View more posts on Milan Design Week 2019 here on this blog

Bagatelle No.25 WoO 59/Bia 515

Für Elise

Bagatelle No. 25 in A minor WoO 59/Bia 515 for solo piano, commonly known as “Für Elise”, is one of Ludwig van Beethoven’s most popular compositions. It is usually classified as a bagatelle. The composition was not published during Beethoven’s lifetime, having been discovered by Ludwig Nohl 40 years after the composer’s death. The identity of “Elise” is unknown.

Bagatelle No. 25 WoO 59, Bia 515
(image via wikipedia.org / Knowledge via wikipedia.org}

Unpretentious

A bagatelle is a short piece of music, typically for the piano, and usually of a light, mellow character. The name bagatelle literally means “a short unpretentious instrumental composition” as a reference to the light style of a piece. The earliest use of the name “bagatelle” for a musical work was by François Couperin, in his tenth harpsichord ordre (1717), in which a rondeau is titled “Les bagatelles’.

Post-World War II Sunray Therapy

Post-World War II Sunray Therapy

“Post-World War II, until the Sixties, ‘sunray therapy’ — the therapeutic use of ultra-violet lamps — was widely championed across the UK as an antidote for everything from throat infections to acne.” (via dailymail.co.uk)

We think these images of the sunray therapy rooms are simply stunning! Just sharing. Have a nice day! xoxo Mimi Berlin

Staying healthy with ultra-violet lamps (and goggles)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2635599/For-years-doctors-prescribed-sore-throats-childhood-acne-How-sunray-therapy-ultra-violet-lamps-generation-risk-cancer.html#ixzz4fZ5PpTKH
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Shadows at the Tinguely retrospective at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam

Shadows at the Tinguely retrospective at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam

Mimi Blogger Team visited the Jean Tinguely exhibition ‘Machinespectacle’ at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam the other day. (we did that live on instagram by the way) There is somethng about this exhibition we want to discuss with y’all: the shadows.

Yes, the shadows! We got distracted by how the works were lit: very inconsistent in our opinion. We got confused in one of the first rooms, which was filled with (earlier) works in black and white; mostly presented on the walls. Sometimes the light created shadows that were very pretty, either on the wall or on the work itself. But this ‘shadowplay’ wasn’t very consistent and thus distracting for us. And that’s no fun, walking through an exhibition trying to figure out what the idea of the lightplan is, when you should be enjoying art.

Office Party with Chris Kabel

Office Party with Chris Kabel

(photocredits; JW Kaldenbach)
At the Salon/Paris presentation during The Grand Paris Design Festival, we bumped into to these very festive neon lights, designed by Chris Kabel. Mr Kabel created a device to cover the neon tubes with colorful, transparent garlands. When the Office Party is over you can just slide the garlands back! A nifty light design, Auch Haben! Continue reading