Milan Design Week 2018 Cubism

Cubism in Interior Design

Next to many round and friendly interior design we also noticed some cubist inspired decor. Not that much, but we feel it could well be the next trend. It almost has to be, because all the ‘Barbapapa’ furniture design you can think of has already been made, for a couple of seasons, by all brands at this point.

These four are the most evident examples of design, leaning towards Cubist shapes: Carpet from Moroso/ Mural by Siri Carlén for Lammhults / Motorcycle Samotracia Mario Trimarchi for De Castelli / Mirror from ClassiCon.

More reports on Milan Design week 2018 by Mimi berlin Blogger Team

Milan Design Week 2018: Friendly Furniture

Friendly Furniture or ‘no harm’ design

Maybe it’s us. Maybe it’s a trend: Friendly Furniture. At the Milan Design week 2018 we saw too many, too much:
Sofa’s disguised as Barbapapa. (from tacchini.it)
Rounded corners and edges; chairs, cupboards and even scissors seemed unharmful (as in babyproof).
Disproportional furniture and accessoiries making you feel small-sized. And, on top of it all; many of these designs are produced in pastel colors. (and in 70s like orange/brown colorschemes)

Oh: we almost forgot to mention the peaceful incense in the shape of a dove!

By the time we saw a presentation smiling at us we had enough of it; and longed for the next trend in line: which we predict will be no-fun, black, shiny and hard: furniture with edges designed to look uncomfortable and nasty!

PS:
Of course there is ‘no-fun’ design to be found; but it’s not yet fully descended, style und trendwise. Also a more divers colorscheme than the ‘baby-pastels’ were presented: we just feel that this trend is the most found in ‘design-land’ for the longest time.

More reports on Milan Design week 2018 by Mimi berlin Blogger Team

Resort 2016 Fashion Shows: Looks

Resort 2016 Fashion Shows: Looks

Black and white (Minimal und Frilly)

Pastel (Frilly und Minimal)

Romantic

Discotheque

Clean

Checks and minimals (Clean und Romantic)

Flowers (Romantic und Clean)

Decisions, Decisions.
We chose one favorite look from (almost) every designer showing the Resort 2015 season, featured on vogue.com, and tried to incorporate as many brands as possible, choosing one look only.

Why? Sometimes it’s good to test yourself. We think it’s important to see what happens when you approach things differently than you’re used to. So we zoomed in on the runway Looks instead of the complete collections, like we normally do. Funny thing is; this way we come up with only “usual-suspect” trends: boring! We did look at designers we have never seen before, that’s less boring but also very time consuming, and we all know time=money 😉
Conclusion: We will never again let go of our experience and knowledge about fashion trends, brands and designers. The way we spot our trends is the right way and the fun way!

(all images via vogue.com)

 

 

Spring 2015 Prêt-à-Porter: Historical

Spring 2015 Prêt-à-Porter: Historical

One of our favorite shows was by Christian Dior, designed by Raf Simons. So much detail and historical knowledge to be seen here! Set in the modern age in a crisp and clean way.

Touched by time: unfinished roughness

Creating a feel of worn clothes by using lace, brocade or other antique fabrics to patch up the garments, creating a hand made look by making use of unfinished edges and top stitching.

Nightgowns

Silk with lace at Francesco Scognamiglio. Spooky fun in broderie anglaise by Hermès. Historically accurate at Dior.

(all images via style.com)

Spring 2015 Prêt-à-Porter: Native American Girl

Spring 2015 Prêt-à-Porter: Native American Girl

Seeing Native American Girls on the runway for Spring 2015 is a bit of a surprise, but maybe a logical one when reminiscing the exuberant use of feathers last season. Don’t dig to deep when re-creating this theme to your own style; Next to the use of the obvious feathers we see (Native American) ingredients such as fringes, abstract prints and short leather dresses. That’s exactly what they worked with at Etro: You have your poncho, the fringes and the moccasins completing a look we know from Isabel Marant in her earlier days. Fendi created a more abstract clean-cut vision, they sliced fabric to create fringes. Without the styling these garments aren’t “Native American” anymore. Same goes for Giambatista Valli, they put the Native American Girl in a sixties time-warp and dressed her in white. To conclude this story we must mention the fringes again, there were a lot them at different shows. Mostly used with a retro seventies vibe for short skirts, dresses and accessories. (all images via style.com)clrcrd_nativePresto! your color-card for this theme.